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Kanye West escorted out of Skechers office after showing up unannounced

Executives at Skechers escorted Kanye West out of the company’s corporate offices in Los Angeles, after the rapper and fashion designer showed up “unannounced and without invitation” on Wednesday.

Kanye West was removed from Skechers’ corporate offices in Los Angeles after he arrived ‘unannounced and without invitation’. Photograph: Ashley Landis/AP

Executives at Skechers escorted Kanye West out of the company’s corporate offices in Los Angeles, after the rapper and fashion designer showed up “unannounced and without invitation” on Wednesday.

In a statement released after the incident, the footwear brand said it “has no intention of working with West” and that the artist, now known as Ye, was engaged in “unauthorized filming”.

“He and his party” were removed from the building after a “brief conversation”, the company added.

Skechers’ comments come a day after Adidas ended its longtime collaboration with Ye, following a spate of antisemitic comments made by Ye in recent weeks.

“We condemn his recent divisive remarks and do not tolerate antisemitism or any other form of hate speech,” Skechers said.

Ye has been spreading antisemitic conspiracy theories in interviews and on social media. And earlier this month, he generated outrage by presenting T-shirts at Paris fashion week that featured the slogan “White Lives Matter”, a phrase associated with white supremacists.

Ye has become increasingly isolated as multiple brands distance themselves from him.

Gap, which terminated its tie-up with Ye in September, is now taking immediate steps to remove Yeezy Gap products from its stores and shut down YeezyGap.com. Balenciaga also severed ties with him, and the end of his lucrative Adidas deal means Ye is reportedly no longer a billionaire. His longtime talent agency CAA is said to no longer be representing him.

Political leaders in California also joined the chorus of those condemning Ye’s behavior this week, after recent antisemitic incidents in Los Angeles – some of which specifically referenced Ye’s comments about Jews – put residents on edge.

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